Everybody Was So Young

Gerald and Sara Murphy: A Lost Generation Love Story
Product Number: EB00046706
Released: Jun 04, 2013
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9780544268944
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Description

New York Times Bestseller: "A marvelously readable biography" of the couple and their relationships with Picasso, Fitzgerald, and other icons of the era (The New York Times Book Review). Wealthy Americans with homes in Paris and on the French Riviera, Gerald and Sara Murphy were at the very center of expatriate cultural and social life during the modernist ferment of the 1920s. Gerald Murphy—witty, urbane, and elusive—was a giver of magical parties and an acclaimed painter. Sara Murphy, an enigmatic beauty who wore her pearls to the beach, enthralled and inspired Pablo Picasso (he painted her both clothed and nude), Ernest Hemingway, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. The models for Nicole and Dick Diver in Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night, the Murphys also counted among their friends John Dos Passos, Dorothy Parker, Fernand Leger, Archibald MacLeish, Cole Porter, and a host of others. Far more than mere patrons, they were kindred spirits whose sustaining friendship released creative energy. Yet none of the artists who used the Murphys for their models fully captured the real story of their lives: their Edith Wharton childhoods, their unexpected youthful romance, their ten-year secret courtship, their complex and enduring marriage—and the tragedy that struck them, when the world they had created seemed most perfect. Drawing on a wealth of family diaries, photographs, letters and other papers, as well as on archival research and interviews on two continents, this "brilliantly rendered biography" documents the pivotal role of the Murphys in the story of the Lost Generation (Los Angeles Times). "Often considered minor Lost Generation celebrities, the Murphys were in fact much more than legendary party givers. Vaill's compelling biography unveils their role in the European avant-garde movement of the 1920s; Gerald was a serious modernist painter. But Vaill also shows how their genius for friendship and for transforming daily life into art attracted the most creative minds of the time." —Library Journal

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Author(s): Amanda Vaill
Original Publish Date: May 02, 2013

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