The Wordy Shipmates

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Author(s): Sarah Vowell
Original Publish Date: Oct 07, 2008
eAudio - unabridged
Audio (7.25 hours)
Product Number: Z100134803
Released: Feb 12, 2018
Business Term: 2 Year
ISBN: #9780743578202
Narrator/s: Sarah Vowell
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Description

New York Times bestselling author Sarah Vowell explores the Puritans and their journey to America in The Wordy Shipmates. Even today, America views itself as a Puritan nation, but Vowell investigates what that means -- and what it should mean. What was this great political enterprise all about? Who were these people who are considered the philosophical, spiritual, and moral ancestors of our nation? The people she finds are highly literate, deeply principled, and surprisingly feisty. Their story is filled with pamphlet feuds, witty courtroom dramas, and bloody vengeance. Along the way she asks: - Was Massachusetts Bay Colony governor John Winthrop a communitarian, a Christ-like Christian, or conformity's tyrannical enforcer? Answer: Yes! - Was Rhode Island's architect, Roger Williams, America's founding freak or the father of the First Amendment? Same difference. - What was the Puritans' pet name for the Pope? The Great Whore of Babylon. Sarah Vowell's special brand of armchair history makes the bizarre and esoteric fascinatingly relevant and fun. She takes us from the modern-day reenactment of an Indian massacre to the Mohegan Sun casino, from old-timey Puritan poetry, to a Mayflower-themed waterslide. The Wordy Shipmates is rich in historical fact, humorous insight, and social commentary by one of America's most celebrated voices. Thou shalt enjoy it.

All formats/editions

eBook
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Author(s): Sarah Vowell
Genre: Humor, History
Product Number EB00398186
Released: Jun 05, 2014
Business Term: 2 Year
Publisher: Riverhead Books
ISBN: #9781440638695

Professional reviews

"Essayist and public radio contributor Sarah Vowell recounts the journey of the ARABELLA, England's lesser-known Puritan venture to the New World, and the ensuing settlement of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. In an endeavor hefty in scope and satire, Vowell's charmingly childlike voice and tempered pace ease the listener along as she discusses the Puritanical origins of the muddled relationship between church and state in the U.S. With subtle inflections and her famously deadpan sarcasm, Vowell simply yet eloquently articulates her case for secular government. An assortment of celebrities intermittently recites Vowell's referenced historical quotes in earnest, enhancing the bill. The erudite performance also benefits from a handful of brief Old World musical interludes, aptly evoking the Seafaring Age. A.P.C. (c) AudioFile 2008, Portland, Maine"

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