The Dolorous Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ

eAudio - unabridged
Audio (11.82 hours)
Product Number: Z00818
Released: Mar 28, 2011
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781449887940
Narrator/s: Roger Basick
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Description

This anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format. From Shakespeare's finesse to Oscar Wilde's wit, this unique collection brings together works as diverse and influential as The Pilgrim's Progress and Othello. As an anthology that invites readers to immerse themselves in the masterpieces of the literary giants, it is must-have addition to any library.

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The Dolorous Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ
Product Number: BX00006965
Product Number:CK090
Product Number:Z00818

This title is part of (or scheduled to be part of) the following subscriptions:

RBdigital Audio Adult Subscription
RBdigital Audio Adult Academic Library Subscription
RBdigital Unlimited Access Audio Subscription - RB titles

All formats/editions

CD
x-large
Narrator(s): Roger Basick
Genre: Religion
Product Number CK090
Released: Jun 28, 2004
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781402592799
eAudio
x-large
Narrator(s): Bernadette Dunne
Product Number Z100026799
Released: Jan 29, 2008
Business Term: Purchase
Publisher: Books on Tape
ISBN: #9781415951170
x-large
Narrator(s): Wanda McCaddon
Product Number Z100096440
Released: Jun 21, 2015
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781481579919

Professional reviews

"After introductory music, this production begins its nearly two hundred tracks of Roger Basick reading from THE VISIONS OF ANNE CATHERINE EMMERICH. This nineteenth-century recounting of Jesus's suffering is highly detailed, and those seeking material for Christian meditations will find much here. Basick's delivery is clear and easy to follow, but curiously calm for such pain-filled passages. While his tones are friendly and welcoming, his flat delivery drains emotion from the story, and, though it seems presumptuous to critique a mystical account, Emmerich's prose style will seem dated to the modern ear, and further limit the work's appeal. G.T.B. (c) AudioFile 2004, Portland, Maine"

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