April 1865

The Month That Saved America
CD - unabridged
Audio (13 discs)
Product Number: C02001
Released: Apr 23, 2015
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781470316235
Narrator/s: Jay Winik
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Description

This New York Times best-seller from noted historian and acclaimed author Jay Winik forever changes common perceptions of the final month of the American Civil War. April 1865 could have destroyed the nation. Instead, it saved it. As April begins, the battered Confederate capital of Richmond falls to the Union Army. Robert E. Lee surrenders his forces to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox one week later. In good spirits and sensing the war's end, President Abraham Lincoln attends a comedic play--and is assassinated. Simultaneously, Secretary of State William Seward is brutally attacked, but survives. Along with fears that remaining Confederate soldiers will break into guerrilla bands, these events threaten to plunge America into turmoil. But it is not to be. Winik's engrossing narrative sweeps readers along from one incredible moment to the next until, remarkably, peace is reached. A provocative and deeply researched account, this modern classic is a major reassessment of the 30 most pivotal days in United States history.

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Author(s): Jay Winik
Genre: History

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April 1865
Product Number: BX00038186
Product Number:Z11340
Product Number:C02001

All formats/editions

eAudio
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Author(s): Jay Winik
Narrator(s): Jay Winik
Genre: History
Product Number Z11340
Released: Apr 03, 2015
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781490692784
eBook
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Author(s): Jay Winik
Genre: History
Product Number EB00233580
Released: Mar 17, 2014
Business Term: 26 Circ
ISBN: #9780062029201

Professional reviews

"This work has a split personality. Jay Winik the author has written a terrific bit of history about one of the most important months in United States history. Unfortunately, Jay Winik the narrator has ruined his own book. With all of the vocal talent available, it's difficult to understand why Winik was chosen, or chose, to narrate. There's little variation in his voice, so all lists sound the same, the ends of sentences sound the same, he stumbles over words, and his idea of a character voice is to read louder. In short, this sounds like an amateur production and is a very disappointing effort. By all means, read this important book--in print. R.I.G. (c) AudioFile 2002, Portland, Maine"

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