A Writer's People

Ways of Looking and Feeling
eAudio - unabridged
Audio (5.33 hours)
Product Number: Z100095625
Released: Jun 21, 2015
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781481551366
Narrator/s: Simon Vance
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Description

Born in Trinidad of Indian descent, a resident of England for his entire adult life, and a prodigious traveler, V. S. Naipaul has always faced the challenges of "fitting one civilization to another." Here, he takes us into his sometimes inadvertent process of creative and intellectual assimilation, which has shaped both his writing and his life. In a probing narrative that is part meditation and part remembrance, Naipaul discusses the writers to whom he was exposed early on and his first encounters with literary culture. He looks at what we have retained and what we have forgotten of the classical world, and he illuminates the ways in which Indian writers such as Gandhi and Nehru both reveal and conceal themselves and their nation. Full of humor and privileged insight, this is an eloquent, intimate exploration into the configuration of a writer's mind.

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Author(s): V.S. Naipaul
Original Publish Date: Apr 29, 2008

All formats/editions

eBook
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Author(s): V.S. Naipaul
Product Number EB00169768
Released: Dec 30, 2013
Business Term: 2 Year
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: #9780307269485

Professional reviews

"Naipaul's book is a pleasant, sometimes repetitive, hodgepodge of memoir, thoughts on books and writers, and reflections on history, especially India's. Simon Vance, who is highly skilled and experienced, narrates with intelligence, nuance, and feeling (sometimes just a bit too much feeling or emphasis). His very professionalism, oddly, calls attention to the fact that this is not the author reading these first-person observations. Vance's English accent, unlike Naipaul's, has no flavor of the Caribbean, or even the subcontinent. Even one who has never heard Naipaul, just from hearing his personal history, may find this reading, while technically nearly impeccable, actorly, bland, and inauthentic. But barring a personal reading, this is the best one can reasonably expect. W.M. (c) AudioFile 2008, Portland, Maine"

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