Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms

Journeys into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East
eAudio - unabridged
Audio (11.25 hours)
Product Number: Z100089647
Released: Feb 02, 2015
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781494528775
Narrator/s: Michael Page
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc
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Description

Despite its reputation for religious intolerance, the Middle East has long sheltered many distinctive and strange faiths. These religions represent the last vestiges of the magnificent civilizations in ancient history: Persia, Babylon, and Egypt in the time of the pharaohs. Their followers have learned how to survive foreign attacks and the perils of assimilation. But today, with the Middle East in turmoil, they face greater challenges than ever before. In Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms, former diplomat Gerard Russell ventures to the distant, nearly impassable regions where these mysterious religions still cling to survival. He lives alongside the Mandaeans and Ezidis of Iraq, the Zoroastrians of Iran, the Copts of Egypt, and others. He learns their histories, participates in their rituals, and comes to understand the threats to their communities. Historically a tolerant faith, since the early twentieth century, Islam has witnessed the rise of militant, extremist sects. This development poses existential threats to these minority faiths. And as more and more of their youth flee to the West in search of greater freedoms and job prospects, these religions face the dire possibility of extinction.

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Author(s): Gerard Russell
Original Publish Date: Jan 13, 2015

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CD
x-large
Author(s): Gerard Russell
Narrator(s): Michael Page
Product Number DD16177
Released: Jan 13, 2015
Business Term: Purchase
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc
ISBN: #9781494508777

Professional reviews

"This audiobook is different from most current books on the Middle East. Its focus is on ancient religions of the region that are trying to survive rather than on those that are in the news. It's as much a travelogue and anthropological study as it is a fascinating history. Michael Page's stately, formal British accent is reminiscent of informational programs on public television. This isn't a bad thing, but his voice doesn't rise above the facts to present a more compelling vision of the book. While it would have been better if he could have varied his pitch and tone more, he pronounces each word carefully and does a great job with the names and places. Overall, he speaks at a pace that allows listeners to ponder the book's broad ideas. R.I.G. © AudioFile 2015, Portland, Maine"

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