1919

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Author(s): Eve L. Ewing
Original Publish Date: Jan 21, 2020
eAudio - unabridged
Audio (1.08 hours)
Product Number: Z100156034
Released: Jan 21, 2020
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781494538446
Narrator/s: Eve L. Ewing
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc
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Description

The Chicago Race Riot of 1919, the most intense of the riots comprising the nation's Red Summer, has shaped the last century but is not widely discussed. In 1919, award-winning poet Eve L. Ewing explores the story of this event-which lasted eight days and resulted in thirty-eight deaths and almost 500 injuries-through poems recounting the stories of everyday people trying to survive and thrive in the city. Ewing uses speculative and Afrofuturist lenses to recast history, and illuminates the thin line between the past and the present.

This title is part of (or scheduled to be part of) the following subscriptions:

RBdigital Unlimited Audio - Pub Library - US Collection
RBdigital Unlimited Audio - Pub Library - Canada Collection
RBdigital Unlimited Audio - Higher Ed - Curriculum - Platinum Collection
RBdigital Unlimited Audio - Higher Ed - Curriculum - Gold Collection

All formats/editions

eBook
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Author(s): Eve L. Ewing
Product Number EB00793864
Released: Dec 02, 2019
Business Term: Purchase
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: #9781608466009

Professional reviews

"Award-winning poet Eve L. Ewing narrates her provocative poetry, which uncovers the race riots of 1919 in Chicago. In the beginning she sounds like she is reading. She's clear and speaks at a moderate pace, emphasizing certain words. Then her tone begins to change. The rhythm in her voice creates its own melody. As she progresses, she becomes spritely at times. The ebb and flow of energy in her reading includes an onset of repetition, lullaby singing, and cultural vernacular. Ewing is youthful in her lullabies but clearly an adult in her descriptions when she speaks of the drowning of Eugene Williams and the onset of violent acts. The poetic magnetism in her narration brings the Red Summer of 1919 to life. T.E.C. © AudioFile 2020, Portland, Maine"