935 Lies

The Future of Truth and the Decline of America's Moral Integrity
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Author(s): Charles Lewis
Original Publish Date: Jul 08, 2014
eAudio - unabridged
Audio (8.98 hours)
Product Number: Z100082947
Released: Jul 08, 2014
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781622311668
Narrator/s: Don Lee
Publisher: HighBridge Company
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Description

Facts are and must be the coin of the realm in a democracy. Unfortunately, for citizens in the United States and throughout the world, distinguishing between fact and fiction-always a formidable challenge-is now more difficult than ever, as a constant stream of questionable information pours into media outlets. In 935 Lies, Charles Lewis reminds us of the history of public dishonesty in the United States, from President Lyndon B. Johnson's cover-up of the real motives behind the Vietnam War, to George W. Bush's public rationales for military action in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how courageous investigative journalists stood up to power to bring truth to light. He then explores the implications for today: what are the root causes and consequences of this kind of mass deception? Lewis argues forcefully that while data points and factoids abound, it is much harder to get to the whole truth of complex issues in time for that truth to guide citizens, voters, and decision-makers.

This title is part of (or scheduled to be part of) the following subscriptions:

RBdigital Unlimited Audiobooks - US Collection
RBdigital Unlimited Audiobooks - Canada Collection
RBdigital Unlimited Audiobooks - Platinum Curriculum Collection - HE

Professional reviews

"The explosive growth of data and information has been a boon to the U.S., but this audiobook posits that itÕs also allowed our political leaders to hide the truth and to lie about their actions. Narrator Don LeeÕs deep voice and deliberate pacing fit the bookÕs ominous theme well, and he enunciates every word. ItÕs the authorÕs view that the press has become complicit in spreading false information and is not doing its job to inform the public. It will all lead, he says, to a country in which voters will not have the necessary information to make intelligent policy choices. LeeÕs main limitation is that he reads in a monotone. This makes the book less engaging than it might have been despite its important message. R.I.G. © AudioFile 2014, Portland, Maine"

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