Future Perfect

The Case for Progress in a Networked Age
eAudio - unabridged
Audio (5.43 hours)
Product Number: Z100101017
Released: Aug 10, 2015
Business Term: Purchase
ISBN: #9781624060199
Narrator/s: Samuel Cohen
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Description

Combining the deft social analysis of Where Good Ideas Come From with the optimistic arguments of Everything Bad Is Good for You, Steven Johnson's Future Perfect argues that a new model of political change is on the rise, transforming everything from local governments to drug research to arts funding and education. Johnson paints a compelling portrait of this new political worldview - influenced by the success of the Internet but not dependent on high-tech solutions - that breaks with the traditional categories of liberal or conservative thinking. With his acclaimed flair for multidisciplinary storytelling and big idea books, Johnson explores this new vision of progress through a series of fascinating narratives: from the 'miracle on the Hudson' to the invention of the Internet itself.

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Author(s): Steven Johnson
Original Publish Date: Jan 01, 1900

All formats/editions

eBook
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Author(s): Steven Johnson
Product Number EB00384896
Released: Jun 05, 2014
Business Term: 2 Year
Publisher: Riverhead Books
ISBN: #9781101596975

Professional reviews

"Johnson looks at the success of peer networks, as opposed to centralized structures, at creating innovation and more efficient markets. Through this collective collaboration and competition, he believes, an emerging progressive movement is manifesting itself as both a political affiliation and a philosophy. Samuel Cohen narrates at a good pace, alternating cleanly between the stories and the quotations, which are set aside from Johnson's arguments by a variety of accents. Using the original French railway system as a metaphor for what's wrong with traditional social and political structures, Johnson proposes tapping into networks to widen reach and participation. Cohen puts just the right emphasis on Johnson's words, moving from topic to topic, and the jargon associated with each, with aplomb. E.N. (c) AudioFile 2012, Portland, Maine"

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